Saturday, October 17, 2009

Update On The Kid Killer

Photos Courtesy of MThai News

BANGKOK – Siripong Garnjananivit, 40-years-old, the killer who chopped up Sho Makino, a half-Japanese 5-year-old boy into 12 pieces pleaded for forgiveness in front of the boy’s picture. The man, in tears, wished for the child to go to heaven and to forgive him for his evil doings. He said Sho was a good, cute boy who shouldn’t have ended up the way he did. “If there’s reincarnation, I want him to be reborn as my son,” the killer said.

Siripong Garnjananivit was a taxi driver and had started a relationship with Sunan Srisuwan, the mother of Sho Makino. Her corpse had been thrown onto a side road; she was killed by Siripong.

Siripong confessed to murdering both the mother and son out of pressure and built-up anger. He told police that Sunan had asked him to kill her ex-husband, of which he refused. When Sunan kept repeating that she would send someone else to kill him if he didn’t do it for her, Siripong said he felt overcome and killed Sunan to defend himself. “I had no choice,” he said.

On the day of the murders, this is what happened:

Sunan, Sho Makino, and Mint Jongngamwilai (Sunan’s daughter who survived) arrived at Suvarnabhumi Airport. Siripong drove his cab to pick them up with a fully loaded colt revolver underneath his seat. As the car took off, Siripong reached for the gun and shot at the back-seats until he was out of bullets. Sunan and Sho Makino died instantly while Mint was injured and pretended to be dead. Siripong drove the taxi back to his apartment, took a shower, then carried the body of Sho into the bathroom and began cutting. Sunan and Sho were then left in a side street as stated in earlier reports. Mint, the daughter, survived because when Siripong found out she was not dead, he did not kill her. Mint is now recovering under the protection of police.

Siripong's daughter spoke in his defense in an interview, saying how kind and nice her father is. She blames Sunan for manipulating her father with threats and mind games.

When Mint, Sunan’s daughter woke up from recovery, she told police a very different story.

Police are not satisfied with Siripong’s motives and confessions. Investigations are still underway.

Writer: Adrian Tse & Chet Chetchotisak